A bizarre "Dead Sea goes Ballerman experience" and the most beautiful view in the world. A travelogue. {Travel Israel}

I stare blankly at the artificial green lawns - hundreds of people are squeezing on it. In the two round blue pools you do not actually see any water, just a sea of ​​heads. A beach ball flies past my head. Children scream. From different speakers sounds loud techno-rum-bums. 10 meters further, a barbecue is lit with amazing smoke development. The noise and bustle are indescribable and stupefying.

And there's another unavoidable photo-camel on which a crab-red burned gentleman with a whiskey glass and a burning cigar is posing , Runs he calls in Russian his companions something. They burst into roaring laughter as the gentleman tries to keep his extremely stout belly on the unwillingly wavering camel despite the whiskey and cigar.

Dressed only in a Speedo, with a cigar and whiskey on it Photo camel

No question - I just woke up in one of my personal nightmares. But I'm on the Dead Sea! The magical biblical place where, among other things Lot's wife is frozen to the pillar of salt and Cleopatra also cultivated their world-famous beauty. And now this Baggersee disaster with the worst Mallorca Atitüde. I had imagined everything so very different ... well, but how?

I I hereby agree: I am an unprepared traveler traveling. I do not rummage for weeks through blogs or TripAdvisor. I do not order fancy secret-phrases to put the craziest squares, restaurants, or public, designer-designed toilets on daily schedules. And I do not spy on the whole route on Google Earth or Streetview before. Mostly I buy at the airport for rough orientation the absolute standard work with name of an Italian sailor. The rest is self-evident. The man and I love road trips and discoveries and so far, the most beautiful experiences have always resulted locally through coincidences and advice from locals. This time, however, this method has probably shown a small weakness. Yeah.

Now I'm standing here like Lot's wife and wondering how to survive the next few hours. And where - to the cuckoo - because now this Dead Sea is. Does not it shimmer blue through the palm trees? I work with care through the artificial turf area - and then it's still there: the Dead Sea. Large, imposing and surprisingly deep below me, the largest salt lake on earth spreads. And there are actually people in the water - but much less! I have to go there!

The surface of the Dead Sea sinks by a good 1,70 meters each year

A short time later I left the collective dressing room behind me and make me in a bathing suit to the descent to the lake. On floors you can go down stairs to the water. The surface of the Dead Sea sinks every year by a good 1.70 meters - leaving behind these natural levels. Calculations predict that there will be no lake at this point in 300 years. I involuntarily go a little faster. On a larger floor there are awnings and white plastic chairs. Did the lake shore begin here 20 or 30 years ago? The umbrellas exude in any case a picturesque 70s-postcard-flair.

Then I stand and marvel. And can not get enough.On the bank opposite the mountain ranges that belong to Jordan. Only one or two tiny structures can be found on the other side of the river. And on the right the view of the seemingly infinite lake ... to the horizon.

A touch of eternity appeals to me.

I suddenly notice that I left the techno sounds and crowds behind me. It is quiet, the sky is unbelievably blue, the sun shines with blinding rays and a light wind brings refreshment. It is wonderful! This width. And these colors. Everything is as clear and defined as if there were really only three elements here: sand, water and stone. No green. No nuances. A touch of eternity appeals to me.

capture one of the white plastic chairs under the next awning, leave my bag and shoes behind, and continue on the descent to the lakeshore. The ground under my feet is hot and somehow strangely soft. It is the famous dark mineral mud from the Dead Sea, baked to brown shore banks. I overcame the last - suddenly very hot meters - and then I'm in the Dead Sea.

The water is warm and feels very soft and surprisingly oily. This is ensured by the extremely high sentence content of 30%, which allows no life in the lake, but should bring relief in many skin diseases. However, you also quickly realize where you might just have small bruises or scratches - it burns hellishly for a short time! Mimimimimi! By no means should one get the water in the eye or swallow it. Or curiously try how salty it really is. I've done that for you once and for all and you do not have to do that anymore. Incidentally, the smallest amounts of salt water immediately lead to pronounced gagging.

I let myself drift and enjoy the wonderful view in the distance.

However, the buoyancy of the water is absolutely awesome. Without effort, you drift like an unsinkable cork on the water - pure relaxation in a almost weightlessness. I let myself drift and enjoy the wonderful view in Weite. The landscape is simply beautiful in its sparse nature. Happiness flows through me - it's wonderful to be here. In this special place, which attracted people so many thousands of years ago and which so often appears in the oldest writings in the world. What did it look like in Jesus' time? It may very well be that large parts of the landscape was covered by flowering date groves 2,000 years ago. In nearby Qumran, millions of date cores have been found during excavations. Today, however, the Dead Sea literally looks biblical at this point.

It is very tempting to bob along the Dead Sea forever peacefully. But it is also very dangerous. One quickly underestimates the force of the sun multiplied by the salt content of the water - the worst sunburns threaten. I want to be reasonable and leave the water despite sunblock after 30 minutes and shower extensively with fresh water. On the shore, a few bathers rubbed enthusiastically and exuberantly with the dark mud from the lake floor. Here it is available for free - later it is packaged in the souvenir shop in no bag for $ 15 offered.But then I realize that this is definitely the strongest sunburn I've ever seen! Quickly I throw myself in my plastic chair in the shade and pity the poor devils extensively. They will surely not sit, stand and lie for weeks.

Even from my place under the awning, the landscape is still terrific. I observe an Indian tour group, coming from the artificial turf area, going down to the shore. The ladies all wear long traditional bathing dresses made of cotton. What did you think about the sight of Klein-Baggersee? I think again about the strange "private bathroom" with techno-music and barbecue area. As a private bathroom, it was at least in the description. And it makes perfect sense. The Dead Sea is not a fun lake on whose secluded shores you can climb into the water at will. It is - at least in the north - surrounded by insurmountable desert-like boulders. After bathing in the lake, you need fresh water to wash off the extremely salty water. Shadow is absolutely necessary. And for smaller children the Dead Sea is absolutely not recommended - too big is the risk of water getting in the eye or being swallowed. The screaming you do not want to imagine! Pools where the whole family can have fun are a great idea.

Israelis are very cheerful, loud and lively. And they love to grill.

And today is Shabbat - the weekend in Israel. Of course, many surrounding families come here to bathe and have fun together. Israelis are basically very cheerful, loud and lively. And they like to grill. Done is the perfect shock situation for Northern Europeans with misconceptions of lonely beaches on the Dead Sea. I have to smile about myself. I enjoy reconciling the place and the view for a while. Then it's time to get back on the mini-bus that brings us back to Tel Aviv. With such baby-soft skin, I probably will not have it so soon. And one - despite all precautions - a slight sunburn.

The visit to the Dead Sea was part of a day trip to Jerusalem, Jericho and Qumran. The tour is bookable under Tourist Israel.

Here I have put together 12 practical tips with Dos and Don'ts for trips to wonderful Israel and the Dead Sea.